Artistic Work/Painting Copyright

Artistic works range from paintings, drawings, engravings and craftsmanship. To some extent, it even encompasses architecture and photographs. Like most entities covered by copyright, an art too must be an original work to be protected by the copyright act. The art is protected for the lifetime. The Berne Convention states that two generations of the artist should benefit for the copyright of the predecessor. Once the author of the art is dead, the copyright expires after a particular time, which varies from country to country. The artist is the first owner of the art he produces unless he is contractually bound for an employer, mainly newspapers magazine or studios. 
 
Here are some privileges the author enjoys under the Copyright Act: 
 
Only he has the right to reproduce the work in any manner or form he wants to.
If the work is yet to be published, he is the only one who has the authority to publish it.
Give the permission to use the art in cinema or films.
Making a further adaptation of the work. 
There are very little exceptions to the rule. For example, if the art is shown incidentally in a movie, it is exempted from the act. In those cases where the art is transfixed at a particular place and that place gets recorded in a movie or show, the artist cannot claim copyright infringement. In few countries, the Copyright Act prevents the auction houses from using the copies of art to advertise for sale. Before doing so, the auction house must seek the permission of the owner of the art. However, this clause is prevalent only a select few countries.